harmful_grumpy (harmfulgrumpy) wrote,
harmful_grumpy
harmfulgrumpy

Тайн вокруг строительства пирамид Древнего Египта не осталось


Now the discovery of an ancient papyrus, a ceremonial boat and an ingenious system of waterworks have shed light on the infrastructure created by the builders

КАИР, 25 сен — РИА Новости, Маргарита Кислова. Ученые знают все способы, которые использовали древние египтяне, чтобы перевозить многотонные каменные блоки с юга на север страны к месту строительства великих пирамид Гизы, сообщил в интервью арабской газете "Аш-Шарк аль-Аусат" знаменитый египетский ученый-археолог и бывший глава Министерства по делам древностей Египта Захи Хавас.

A scroll of ancient papyrus has also been found in the seaport Wadi Al-Jarf which has given a new insight into the role boats played in the pyramid’s construction

Накануне газета Daily Mail опубликовала статью (ниже), в которой утверждается, что группа археологов с помощью древнего папируса раскрыла тайну строительства пирамид.
Сообщается, что в документе подробно изложен способ, который египтяне использовали более 4600 лет назад для доставки тяжелых гранитных и известняковых блоков на большие расстояния (более 800 километров: из Асуана на юге Египта в Гизу для строительства большой пирамиды Хеопса). В папирусе, в частности, рассказывается, что для транспортировки применялись специальные строительные водные каналы.

По словам Хаваса, в этом "открытии" нет ничего нового.

"Транспортировка осуществлялась из специального порта в месте разработки камня в Асуане на деревянных лодках, которые двигались по Нилу, а затем по строительным каналам вплоть до специально устроенного порта рядом с пирамидами", — сказал он.

Знаменитый на весь мир археологический комплекс пирамид Гизы находится на западном берегу реки Нил под Каиром. Комплексу более 4,5 тысячи лет, он состоит из трех великих пирамид: Хеопса, Хефрена и Микерина.

РИА Новости https://ria.ru/science/20170925/1505489179.html

The mummy of all mysteries...solved: Archaeologists uncover secrets of how mankind pulled off one of its most awesome miracles - the Great Pyramid of Giza


  • New proof shows how the Egyptians transported 2½-ton blocks for 500 miles

  • Blocks of limestone and granite built the tomb of Pharaoh Khufu in 2,600 BC

  • 170,000 tons carried along the Nile in wooden boats held together by ropes

  • Boats used purpose built channels and canals to an inland port yards from site

By Claudia Joseph For The Mail On Sunday

Published: 22:09 BST, 23 September 2017 |

It has for centuries been one of the world’s greatest enigmas: how a Bronze Age society with little in the way of technology created Egypt’s Great Pyramid of Giza – the oldest and only survivor of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

Now archaeologists have discovered fascinating proof that shows how the Egyptians transported 2½-ton blocks of limestone and granite from 500 miles away to build the tomb of Pharaoh Khufu in about 2,600 BC.

At 481ft tall, it is the biggest of all the pyramids and was, until the Middle Ages, the largest man-made structure on Earth. Now the discovery of an ancient papyrus, a ceremonial boat and an ingenious system of waterworks have shed light on the infrastructure created by the builders.

Archaeologists have discovered proof that shows how the Egyptians transported 2½-ton blocks of limestone and granite from 500 miles away to build the tomb of Pharaoh Khufu in about 2,600 BC

Archaeologists have discovered proof that shows how the Egyptians transported 2½-ton blocks of limestone and granite from 500 miles away to build the tomb of Pharaoh Khufu in about 2,600 BC

The detailed archaeological material shows that thousands of skilled workers transported 170,000 tons of limestone along the Nile in wooden boats held together by ropes, through a specially constructed system of canals to an inland port just yards from the base of the pyramid.

A scroll of ancient papyrus has also been found in the seaport Wadi Al-Jarf which has given a new insight into the role boats played in the pyramid’s construction.

Written by Merer, an overseer in charge of a team of 40 elite workmen, it is the only first-hand account of the construction of the Great Pyramid, and describes in detail how limestone casing stones were shipped downstream from Tura to Giza.

Now archaeologist Mark Lehner, a leading expert in the field, has uncovered evidence of a lost waterway beneath the dusty Giza plateau

In his diary, Merer also describes how his crew were involved in the transformation of the landscape, opening giant dykes to divert water from the Nile and channel it to the pyramid through man-made canals.

Although it has long been known that the granite from the pyramid’s internal chambers was quarried in Aswan, 533 miles south of Giza, and the limestone casing stones came from Tura, eight miles away, archaeologists disagreed over how they were transported.

Now archaeologist Mark Lehner, a leading expert in the field, has uncovered evidence of a lost waterway beneath the dusty Giza plateau. ‘We’ve outlined the central canal basin which we think was the primary delivery area to the foot of the Giza Plateau,’ he said.

The new discoveries are revealed in tonight’s Channel 4 documentary Egypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence, which also includes another team of archaeologists who have unearthed a ceremonial boat designed for Khufu to command in the afterlife, which gives new insights into the construction of vessels at the time.

A team of specialists restored the wooden planks before scanning them with a 3D laser to work out how they were assembled. They discovered that they were sewn together with loops of rope.

lEgypt’s Great Pyramid: The New Evidence is on Channel 4 tonight at 8pm.

Источник: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4913550/How-Great-Pyramid-Giza-built.html


Tags: археология, египет, источники, пирамиды
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